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Motor Control Circuits
Motor Controls:  #'s - D       E - M       N - S        T - Z

 

Last Updated: October 24, 2017 02:55 PM

Circuits Designed by Dave Johnson, P.E. :

Thermostat for 12v Cooling Fan - This circuit will turn on a 12v DC powered cooling fan when the air temperature reaches a certain high temperature and will keep the fan turned on until the temperature drops below a second lower level.  Both the high and low temperatures are both adjustable . . . Hobby Circuit designed by Dave Johnson P.E.-February, 2011

Two Pushbutton Motor Controller - Two small pushbutton switches, a few diodes and two relays form a method to control on/off power to a brush motor as well as the motor direction.  The circuit was originally designed for a motorized lifting platform. . . Circuit by David Johnson P.E.-September, 2005


Links to electronic circuits, electronic schematics, designs for engineers, hobbyists, students & inventors:

T3SE - Type 3 (charge rate controlled) Solar Engines

Tacho generator rectifier -  This page is a bit different from most in that it covers the use of tacho generators as feedback elements in motor control systems.  It also covers a 'Tacho Feedback Board' extra for our Pro-120 and other controllers.  It also includes the circuit diagram.  It thus should be of interest not only to potential customers but also to electronic engineers.   __ Designed by Richard Torrens

Temperature Based Fan Speed Control & Monitoring using Arduino -  This project is a standalone automatic fan speed controller that controls the speed of an electric fan according to the requirement.  Use of embedded technology makes this closed-loop feedback-control system efficient...__ Electronics Projects for You

Temperature Controlled NiCad Charger -  This circuit is for a temperature controlled constant current battery charger.  It works with NICD, NiMH
, and other rechargeable cells.  The circuit works on the principle that most rechargeable batteries show an increase in temperature when the cells becomes fully charged.  Overcharging is one of the main causes of short cell life, hot cells pop their internal seals and vent out electrolyte. __ Designed by G. Forrest Cook

Ten-Amp 13.8 Volt Power Supply -  Sometimes amateurs like to home-brew their power supplies instead of purchasing one off the shelf at any of the major ham radio retail dealers.  The advantage to rolling your own power supply is that it teaches us how they work and makes it easier to troubleshoot and repair other power supply units in the shack.    __ Designed by N1HFX

Tesla Coil/H Volt Generator -  This is a fun and useful circuit for demonstrating high frequency high voltge.  It can produce up to about 30KV, depending on the transformer used.  It is cheap and easy to make, thanks to the standard TV flyback transformer used.  It can power LASERS  (although I have never tried) , demonstrate St.  Elmo's fire, and even cause a fluorescent bulb to light from as much as 2 feet away.   __ Designed by Aaron Cake

The "Miller engine" - Type 1 (Voltage Controlled) Solar Engine -  This is a slightly more-sophisticated design based on a 1381* voltage discriminator. __ Designed by Wilf Rigter

The BEAM Stepper drive -  The 74AC240 stepper driver works by alternately enabling each half of the buffer.  Only one half can be enabled at a time.  Let's assume that the top half of the driver is enabled.  U1A & U1B along with R8, C1, and the input protection resistor R7 form a square wave oscillator.  The outputs of U1A & U1B directly drive one coil of a bipolar stepper motor.   __ Designed by Duane Johnson and Wilf Rigter

The dual slope-sampling solar engine -  If you had time to experiment with the ALF type SE circuit you may have discovered some of its shortcomings with regard to a Power Smart Head adaptation. The problem is that HCMOS gates are power hungry when used as SE voltage comparators when the analog input voltage is near the CMOS switching threshold. If an HCMOS gate is used without sampling, the chip supply current can be as high as 70mA with the comparator input voltage near the trigger threshold  (Vcc / 2) . __ Designed by Wilf Rigter

The GBSE (gate boost solar engine) -  The Gate Boost SE uses a 1381, a 2N7000 MOSFET and a 2N3906 with a unique voltage doubler to increase the voltage applied to the gate of the MOSFET.  Normally the 2.6V output of a 1381C is barely able to turn on the 2N7000.  As a result the "on resistance" of the MOSFET is high and much power is wasted.   __ Designed by Wilf Rigter

The HC11 Controls the Stepper -  Simple circuit with 16-pin Nitron chip 68HC908, easy analog setting, source code with ICC08.  New s-record for 8-pin 68HC908QT2! __ Designed by Ludwig Orgler-Fachingenieur Elektrotechnik

The MicroPower Solar Engine -  A 'micro power solar engine' has been a goal since my introduction to BEAM Robotics.  I believe that if there wasn't one before, I there is one now.  What I'm presenting to you looks very similar to one of the circuits found in Steven Bolt's web pages.  As you will see, I made only minor changes to that design and not without help.   __ Designed by Ken Huntington

The Miller solar engine -  The Miller solar engine uses a 1381* voltage detector  (a.  k.  a.  , a voltage supervisor) IC to drive a voltage-based  (type 1) solar engine.  The 1381 is normally used to reset CPUs and Micros when the power supply drops too low for reliable operation.  So 1381s detect and switch when the input voltage crosses the rated upper and lower threshold voltages.  The upper- and lower-switching voltages are slightly overlapped so that the turn-on voltage is a few hundred mV above the turn-off voltage.  This hysteresis keeps input noise  (around the switching threshold) from resulting in multiple output cycles as the transition occurs.   __ Contact: Eric Seale

The VTSE solar engine -  The VTSE uses the popular 1381 chip and that is its main advantage.  The potentiometer  (or two fixed resistors) connects one leg between the output and input of the 1381 and the other leg to the supply voltage.  These resistors acts like a voltage divider when the SE is off and the 1381 output is low.  In that case, the voltage that appears at the 1381 input is determined by the ratio of the pot or the two resistors and is usually set for 2 times rated 1381 voltage.   __ Designed by Wilf Rigter

The Vx2SE solar engine -  The Vx2SE is a simple discrete voltage-doubling SE for driving an LED.  If the load is a red or green LED, J1 is used together with just one red or green LED for threshold detection  (no 1381) .  For driving a blue LED use two green or red LEDs in series and may require a higher voltage  (3V) solar cell.  With 100uf capacitors the flash frequency is 2-3Hz and the R2 and R3 resistors may be omitted.  With very large capacitors  (0.01F and up) the frequency is much lower and the resistors can be optimized to stretch the LED "on" time.  The Vx2 solar engines will self trigger but are also sensitive to a drop in light and will trigger from a shadow etc.   __ Designed by Wilf Rigter

Thermal cooling fan controller -  As we begin to enjoy those lazy hazy days of summer, the most important thing on most of our minds is how to keep cool during those hot days.  For some of us that means turning up the old air conditioner and sipping on a nice cold glass of our favorite soft drink.  However, we often forget about an equally important __ Designed by Radio Amateur Society of Norwich

Thermal Fan Controller -  The controller uses one or more ordinary silicon diodes as a sensor, and uses a cheap opamp as the amplifier.  I designed this circuit to use 12V computer fans, as these are now very easy to get cheaply.  These fans typically draw about 200mA when running, so a small power transistor will be fine as the switch.  I used a BD140  (1A, 6.5W) , but almost anything you have to hand will work just as well.   __ Designed by Rod Elliott  ESP

Thermofan to Keep Your Amp Cool -  Use a 12V computer fan to cool your amp.    Uses diode temperature sensor f __ Designed by Rod Elliott  ESP

Thermostat for 12v Cooling Fan -  This circuit will turn on a 12v DC powered cooling fan when the air temperature reaches a certain high temperature and will keep the fan turned on until the temperature drops below a second lower level.  Both the high and low temperatures are both adjustable . . . Hobby Circuit designed by Dave Johnson P.E.-February, 2011

Three-Phase Brushless Motor RPM Controller  -  The TPIC43T01/02 is a monolithic motor control integrated Circuit designed to provide RPM control to a 3-phase brushless dc motor.  The device provides two analog sensor input ports which include a speed sensor interface and a Hall effect position interface.  The speed feedback interface consists of an FG amplifier to receive an external sinusoidal signal

Three-Phase Motor Driver Prevents Stall -  01/05/95 EDN-Design Ideas - The circuit in Fig 1 drives a small 24V, 50-Hz motor at about 30 to 40 Hz for use as a chopper motor.  The best starting speed for the motor is about half the final running speed.  Therefore, the circuit uses an intermediate speed to prevent a stall condition.  The circuit uses IC1Ato count down two cycles after the selection of the intermediate speed.  IC1B's Johnson divide-by-three counter and IC2's gates generate the 1208 phase angle __ Circuit Design by PM Kirkby, Crumpsall Electronics, Surrey, England

Time Delay Relay -  A time delay relay is a relay that stays on for a certain amount of time once activated.  This time delay relay is made up of a simple adjustable timer circuit which controls the actual relay.  The time is adjustable from 0 to about 20 seconds with the parts specified.  The current capacity of the circuit is only limited by what kind of relay you decide to use __ Designed by Aaron Cake

Time Delay Relay II -  When activated by pressing a button, this time delay relay will activate a load after a specified amount of time.  This time is adjustable to whatever you want simply by changing the value of a resistor and/or capacitor.  The current capacity of the circuit is only limited by what kind of relay you decide to use __ Designed by Aaron Cake

Tiny Robot -  Recently many kind of robot contests have being opened and some interesting reports of the challenge are found on the web.  The Line Following is a kind of the robot contests to vie running speed on the line.  I build a tiny line following robot which can run on the desk, moving the key board aside will do.  It is for only a personal toy reduced i  __ Designed by The Electronic Lives Manufacturing-presented Chan

Touch Switch using 4011 CMOS NAND Gate IC -  A touch switch is a switch that is turned on and off by touching a wire contact, instead of flicking a lever like a regular switch.  Touch switches have no mechanical parts to wear out, so they last a lot longer than regular switches.  Touch switches can be used in places where regular switches would not last, such as wet or very dusty areas __ Designed by Aaron Cake

Touch Switches -  One of the unusual features of the out-of-production Programmable Drum Set was its use of touch switches for control.  Like most touch switches, these detect the difference in the capacitance of a plate when it is being touched by a finger versus the parasitic capacitance of the plate alone. __ Designed by John Simonton

Transformerless Power Supply -  I have received a few emails asking for a transformerless power supply.  Here is such a supply.  This supply uses no heavy step down transformer and has an extremely low parts count.  The circuit can be built very small and can supply small currents for small projects.  The major downfall of this supply is that it is not isolated from the AC line and can only supply small currents __ Designed by Aaron Cake

Trapezoidal Control of BLDC Motors using Hall Effect Sensors -  The brushless DC motor has stator windings and permanent magnets on the rotor.  The windings are connected to the control electronics and there are no brushes and commutators inside the motor.  The electronics energize the proper windings similar to a commutator; the windings are energized in a moving pattern that rotates around the stator.  The energized stator windings lead the rotor magnet.   __ Designed by Texas Instruments App Notes, 1-Jul-13

Tritium -  Charge Rate-Controlled Solar Engine: The Tritium circuit was the first  (to my knowledge) type 3 SE.  As such, it is quite experimental, and should be regarded as a prototype rather than the 'state of the art'! Nevertheless, it does function reasonably well, and in some circumstances outperforms other solar engines such as the Freds that I have lying around.   __ Designed by Wilf Rigter

Two Basic Motor Speed Controllers -  Here are two simple 12V DC motor speed controllers that can be built for just a few dollars.  They exploit the fact that the rotational speed of a DC motor is directly proportional to the mean value of its supply voltage.  The first circuit shows how variable voltage speed control can be obtained via a

Two Components Drive Stepper Motor -  EDN-Design Ideas - 01/19/95    The extremely simple circuit in Fig 1 drives a stepper motor directly from 120V ac, 60 Hz.  Usually you need switched-dc voltages to drive a stepper motor.  But a stepper motor will run off ac lines if you introduce a 90° phase shift between the voltages applied to the motor's two windings. __ Circuit Design by Carl Spearow, Basler Electric,m Highland, IL

Two Pushbutton Motor Controller -  Two small pushbutton switches, a few diodes and two relays form a method to control on/off power to a brush motor as well as the motor direction.  The circuit was originally designed for a motorized lifting platform. . . Circuit by David Johnson P.E.-September, 2005

Two Wire Stepper Motor Positioner -  A simple and inexpensive way to remotely rotate a display or object is with a positioner that uses a stepper motor to rotate it.  The motor is driven by a circuit mounted near the motor and by a control circuit at a remote location.  __ Golab.com

Two-button control for dangerous machines -  Two button control systems are used on dangerous industrial machines in order to protect the operator’s hands.  Just for hobby I made a circuit that turns on a relay by pressing two buttons simultaneously.   __ Designed by Andrea-Central Italy

Type 1 Solar Engine-voltage controlled trigger -  Voltage controlled trigger - This is by far the predominant form of solar engine, since they are "efficient enough" for most uses, and pretty simple to build.   __ Contact: Eric Seale

Type 2-Solar Engine-time controlled trigger -  Time controlled trigger - These aren't terribly efficient, but are handy for 'bots that need activity at specific times.   __ Contact: Eric Seale

Type 3-Solar Engine-charge curve differentiated -  Charge curve differentiated  (i.  e.  , it triggers when the charge rate of the capacitors slow down) -- These are theoretically the most efficient, though type 3 designs are still in their infancy.   __ Contact: Eric Seale

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Motor Controls:  #'s - D       E - M       N - S        T - Z

 


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